DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

How dehumanising it is when rich people tell those further down the economic food chain they shouldn’t have any small pleasures<p>I have ordered avocado toast a few times in my life, and its mark-up has never particularly appalled me. It is bad value in the same way Starbucks coffee is bad value, or a $20 lipstick, or any of the other extravagances that fly beneath the radar even of those who are trying to save money.</p><p>This month, these items again fell under the moralising gaze of people higher up the economic food chain. “When I was trying to buy my first home,” <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/may/15/australian-millionaire-millennials-avocado-toast-house" title="">said Tim Gurner</a>, a multimillionaire property developer, “I wasn’t buying smashed avocado for $19 and four coffees at $4 each.” He joined Jason Chaffetz, a Republican congressman, <a href="https://www.yahoo.com/news/chaffetz-to-low-income-americans-buy-healthcare-not-iphones-153317516.html" title="">who told low-income Americans</a> in March they should forego smartphones in order to buy health insurance, and those who ask why people “on welfare” insist on smoking. Avocado toast widens the criticism to a larger income bracket, but the principle is the same: you are where you are not for any structural reasons, but because you are a feckless individual.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/may/25/poor-avocados-life-luxuries-rich-people">Continue reading...</a>

So what if the poor buy avocados – everybody deserves a little luxury | Emma Brockes

May 25, 2017 16:42

How dehumanising it is when rich people tell those further down the economic food chain they shouldn’t have any small pleasures

I have ordered avocado toast a few times in my life, and its mark-up has never particularly appalled me. It is bad value in the same way Starbucks coffee is bad value, or a $20 lipstick, or any of the other extravagances that fly beneath the radar even of those who are trying to save money.

This month, these items again fell under the moralising gaze of people higher up the economic food chain. “When I was trying to buy my first home,” said Tim Gurner, a multimillionaire property developer, “I wasn’t buying smashed avocado for $19 and four coffees at $4 each.” He joined Jason Chaffetz, a Republican congressman, who told low-income Americans in March they should forego smartphones in order to buy health insurance, and those who ask why people “on welfare” insist on smoking. Avocado toast widens the criticism to a larger income bracket, but the principle is the same: you are where you are not for any structural reasons, but because you are a feckless individual.

Continue reading...

<p>Also, the average price of a UK home hits £317,000, and the chance to buy a place with a famous history<br></p><p>Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/may/25/eu-roaming-charges-banned-rogue-buyers-exploiting-ebay">Continue reading...</a>

EU roaming charges banned from June, plus the rogue buyers exploiting eBay

May 25, 2017 15:01

Also, the average price of a UK home hits £317,000, and the chance to buy a place with a famous history

Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.

Continue reading...

<p>I have a savings account plus two Isas, and need advice to ensure I can repay the outstanding balance in five years<br></p><p><strong>Q</strong> I have an interest-only mortgage from a well known high street bank. The balance outstanding is £139,000. The lender has informed me that I have five years left to settle this balance and that I need to discuss my options for repaying the mortgage. The options are reviewing the performance of any repayment strategy with a financial adviser; extending the term of the loan to match my repayment strategy; or changing the mortgage so I repay some capital as well as interest (at a rate of 3.49%). </p><p>I regularly save 20%-28% of our monthly income in a savings account offering a low interest rate. I have two Isas and am thinking of starting another.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/may/25/best-way-pay-off-interest-only-mortgage-savings-isa">Continue reading...</a>

What's the best way of paying off my interest-only mortgage?

May 25, 2017 7:00

I have a savings account plus two Isas, and need advice to ensure I can repay the outstanding balance in five years

Q I have an interest-only mortgage from a well known high street bank. The balance outstanding is £139,000. The lender has informed me that I have five years left to settle this balance and that I need to discuss my options for repaying the mortgage. The options are reviewing the performance of any repayment strategy with a financial adviser; extending the term of the loan to match my repayment strategy; or changing the mortgage so I repay some capital as well as interest (at a rate of 3.49%).

I regularly save 20%-28% of our monthly income in a savings account offering a low interest rate. I have two Isas and am thinking of starting another.

Continue reading...

<p>As affordable housing in Britain’s capital is replaced by luxury towers, people on middle incomes are being priced out, while the poor are forced to pay extortionate rents for shocking conditions</p><p>The first time I met Ian Dick, the head of private housing at Newham council in east London, he took me on a walk to look for “beds in sheds”. It was 2011, and alongside criminal levels of overcrowding in private rental properties, there was a growing problem of people living in illegal structures in back gardens. It was not uncommon to find 10 or 20 people living in a room above a fried chicken shop, in a basement, or in ramshackle outbuildings. When we met again, five years later, he was happy to talk to me, not because these problems had disappeared, but because he was proud of the <a href="https://www.newham.gov.uk/Pages/News/Newham-private-rented-property-licensing-scheme-the-enforcers-go-in.aspx">council’s private rented sector licensing regime</a>. Introduced in 2013, it was the first such scheme in the country and had led to 800 prosecutions and 28 landlords being banned from renting property to tenants.</p><p>This time we met in Forest Gate, traditionally one of the most deprived parts of Newham. “This is an area undergoing the most dramatic change – the council doesn’t use the term ‘gentrification’, they use the term ‘regeneration’,” he said as we strolled down a pleasant high street in the sunshine, looking up at Victorian facades renovated by the council. Along the road, hipster cafes and pubs were interspersed with clothing retailers, halal butchers and phone shops. To show me the reality in some of the flats above, he took me around the back, where an entire street was accessed by a badly maintained private alleyway, with a huge pile of mattresses dumped at one end.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/25/london-property-squeeze-affordable-housing">Continue reading...</a>

The great London property squeeze

May 25, 2017 5:30

As affordable housing in Britain’s capital is replaced by luxury towers, people on middle incomes are being priced out, while the poor are forced to pay extortionate rents for shocking conditions

The first time I met Ian Dick, the head of private housing at Newham council in east London, he took me on a walk to look for “beds in sheds”. It was 2011, and alongside criminal levels of overcrowding in private rental properties, there was a growing problem of people living in illegal structures in back gardens. It was not uncommon to find 10 or 20 people living in a room above a fried chicken shop, in a basement, or in ramshackle outbuildings. When we met again, five years later, he was happy to talk to me, not because these problems had disappeared, but because he was proud of the council’s private rented sector licensing regime. Introduced in 2013, it was the first such scheme in the country and had led to 800 prosecutions and 28 landlords being banned from renting property to tenants.

This time we met in Forest Gate, traditionally one of the most deprived parts of Newham. “This is an area undergoing the most dramatic change – the council doesn’t use the term ‘gentrification’, they use the term ‘regeneration’,” he said as we strolled down a pleasant high street in the sunshine, looking up at Victorian facades renovated by the council. Along the road, hipster cafes and pubs were interspersed with clothing retailers, halal butchers and phone shops. To show me the reality in some of the flats above, he took me around the back, where an entire street was accessed by a badly maintained private alleyway, with a huge pile of mattresses dumped at one end.

Continue reading...

<p>Cool views and a place to dock your boat in locations from Cornwall to Florida<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/may/24/homes-with-private-moorings-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes with private moorings – in pictures

May 24, 2017 11:09

Cool views and a place to dock your boat in locations from Cornwall to Florida

Continue reading...

<p>In-work poverty disproportionately concentrated in households in private rented housing as rising living costs bite</p><p>A record 60% of British people in poverty live in a household where someone is in work, according to researchers, with the risk of falling into financial hardship especially high for families in private rented housing.<br></p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2016/dec/09/housing-poverty-trap-work-doesnt-pay">The housing poverty trap means work doesn't pay</a> </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/may/22/record-britons-in-work-poverty-families-study-private-rented-housing">Continue reading...</a>

Record 60% of Britons in poverty are in working families – study

May 22, 2017 17:11

In-work poverty disproportionately concentrated in households in private rented housing as rising living costs bite

A record 60% of British people in poverty live in a household where someone is in work, according to researchers, with the risk of falling into financial hardship especially high for families in private rented housing.

Related: The housing poverty trap means work doesn't pay

Continue reading...

The big parties speak only of practicalities. Perhaps they should try focusing on aesthetics for a change<p>Ostentatious parsimony was the phrase used by <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2015/jun/21/kate-macintosh-one-of-britains-great-unsung-architects-of-social-housing">Kate Macintosh</a>, the woman responsible for some of the most ambitious local authority housing of the 1960s and 70s, to describe the spending environment for the social architect. Housing ministers would speak with pride of stripping out unnecessary extravagances, such as balconies and windows.</p><p>The philosophy went beyond thrift. In social housing, anything above the bare minimum was lavish, and anything lavish was an insult to the public purse. In the 90s, as PFI contracts took hold, the ostentatious parsimony of the state met the carelessness of the investor. How much does a landlord care about liveability – about grace, light, views and carbon emissions?</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/may/22/social-housing-labour-tories-manifestos-homes">Continue reading...</a>

Social housing is good. But let’s make it beautiful too | Zoe Williams

May 22, 2017 7:00

The big parties speak only of practicalities. Perhaps they should try focusing on aesthetics for a change

Ostentatious parsimony was the phrase used by Kate Macintosh, the woman responsible for some of the most ambitious local authority housing of the 1960s and 70s, to describe the spending environment for the social architect. Housing ministers would speak with pride of stripping out unnecessary extravagances, such as balconies and windows.

The philosophy went beyond thrift. In social housing, anything above the bare minimum was lavish, and anything lavish was an insult to the public purse. In the 90s, as PFI contracts took hold, the ostentatious parsimony of the state met the carelessness of the investor. How much does a landlord care about liveability – about grace, light, views and carbon emissions?

Continue reading...

<p>Data suggests buyers are brushing aside Brexit and election uncertainty to seek bigger properties in school catchment areas</p><p>Asking prices for UK homes hit a new record high over the past month as families in search of bigger properties brushed aside uncertainty caused by Brexit and June’s general election.</p><p>Prices sought by sellers rose 1.2% in the four weeks to 13 May, pushing the average asking price to a fresh peak of £317,281, according to the property website <a href="http://www.rightmove.co.uk/">Rightmove</a>.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/may/22/average-asking-price-for-homes-in-uk-hits-record-high-of-317000">Continue reading...</a>

Average asking price for homes in UK hits record high of £317,000

May 22, 2017 6:01

Data suggests buyers are brushing aside Brexit and election uncertainty to seek bigger properties in school catchment areas

Asking prices for UK homes hit a new record high over the past month as families in search of bigger properties brushed aside uncertainty caused by Brexit and June’s general election.

Prices sought by sellers rose 1.2% in the four weeks to 13 May, pushing the average asking price to a fresh peak of £317,281, according to the property website Rightmove.

Continue reading...

<p>From Hitchcock’s studio to the family seat of a former British prime minister, these properties come with a large dose of fame<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/may/19/homes-with-famous-history-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes with a famous history – in pictures

May 19, 2017 23:45

From Hitchcock’s studio to the family seat of a former British prime minister, these properties come with a large dose of fame

Continue reading...

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