DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Grosvenor Group reports worst UK performance since 2008 as Brexit and stamp duty rise cause slowdown in capital</p><p>The 26-year-old Duke of Westminster, who is believed to be the world’s richest person under 30 with a £9bn fortune, has been hit by a steep drop in returns on his family’s British property empire, which includes many of the most famous addresses in London’s Mayfair and Belgravia.</p><p>The Grosvenor Group, which Hugh Grosvenor inherited last year following the death of his father Gerald Grosvenor, <a href="http://www.grosvenor.com/getattachment/50d21ff9-3bf6-4482-aba7-6a181e39e4f6/Financial-Results-Press-Announcement-2016.pdf">reported on Tuesday</a> that returns on its British &amp; Irish property portfolio had collapsed to just 0.3% last year compared with 10.7% in 2015. It is the company’s worst UK performance since the 2008 financial crisis and follows six successive years of returns above 10%. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/apr/25/duke-of-westminster-property-empire-london-grosvenor-group-brexit">Continue reading...</a>

Duke of Westminster's £12bn property firm hit by London slump

Apr 25, 2017 20:43

Grosvenor Group reports worst UK performance since 2008 as Brexit and stamp duty rise cause slowdown in capital

The 26-year-old Duke of Westminster, who is believed to be the world’s richest person under 30 with a £9bn fortune, has been hit by a steep drop in returns on his family’s British property empire, which includes many of the most famous addresses in London’s Mayfair and Belgravia.

The Grosvenor Group, which Hugh Grosvenor inherited last year following the death of his father Gerald Grosvenor, reported on Tuesday that returns on its British & Irish property portfolio had collapsed to just 0.3% last year compared with 10.7% in 2015. It is the company’s worst UK performance since the 2008 financial crisis and follows six successive years of returns above 10%.

Continue reading...

<p>Judge quashes order to repaint London house, in win for property developer who denied choosing colour scheme out of spite</p><p><span tabindex="-1">A woman who angered her neighbours by decorating her multimillion-pound townhouse with red and white stripes can ignore a planning order to repaint the property, the high court has ruled.</span></p><p>Zipporah Lisle-Mainwaring, a property developer, <a draggable="true" href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/may/12/stripes-kensington-house-fun-here-to-stay-owner">painted candy stripes</a> on the three-storey facade of the terrace home in South End, Kensington, west London, in March 2015.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/24/red-white-striped-house-zipporah-lisle-mainwaring">Continue reading...</a>

Court rules woman can keep her red and white striped townhouse

Apr 24, 2017 17:50

Judge quashes order to repaint London house, in win for property developer who denied choosing colour scheme out of spite

A woman who angered her neighbours by decorating her multimillion-pound townhouse with red and white stripes can ignore a planning order to repaint the property, the high court has ruled.

Zipporah Lisle-Mainwaring, a property developer, painted candy stripes on the three-storey facade of the terrace home in South End, Kensington, west London, in March 2015.

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<p>Older generations complain of interest rates that reached 17%. But today’s record lows have contributed to house prices soaring out of reach of the young</p><p>If you’ve ever made the mistake of trying to debate generational inequality with a baby boomer – by pointing out, say, that they benefited from cheap housing, generous welfare and free university places, before voting consistently for governments that have denied those things to their children, all the while calling millennials lazy and entitled in an infuriatingly faux-indulgent way, as if their kids’ requests that their salaries bear some sort of relation to their actual living costs makes them the sort of spoiled divas who’d call a gold-plated Uber to take them to the lavatory ...</p><p>Anyway. If you’ve ever had this annoying row with an ageing relative, then you’ll know that they have one last trump card, one last line of defence for their privileges. Interest rates, they’ll say. None of this <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/dec/15/bank-of-england-uk-interest-rates-slowdown-growth">0.25% Bank of England rate</a> in our day. We had proper interest rates. You don’t know you’re born.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/24/ultra-low-mortgage-rates-bubble-interest-house-prices">Continue reading...</a>

Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble: why ultra-low mortgage rates are dangerous | Jonn Elledge

Apr 24, 2017 11:30

Older generations complain of interest rates that reached 17%. But today’s record lows have contributed to house prices soaring out of reach of the young

If you’ve ever made the mistake of trying to debate generational inequality with a baby boomer – by pointing out, say, that they benefited from cheap housing, generous welfare and free university places, before voting consistently for governments that have denied those things to their children, all the while calling millennials lazy and entitled in an infuriatingly faux-indulgent way, as if their kids’ requests that their salaries bear some sort of relation to their actual living costs makes them the sort of spoiled divas who’d call a gold-plated Uber to take them to the lavatory ...

Anyway. If you’ve ever had this annoying row with an ageing relative, then you’ll know that they have one last trump card, one last line of defence for their privileges. Interest rates, they’ll say. None of this 0.25% Bank of England rate in our day. We had proper interest rates. You don’t know you’re born.

Continue reading...

<p>The capital’s waterways give a growing number of residents affordable berths</p><p>Richard Hagan knows exactly why he likes living on a narrowboat on London’s canals. “It’s the sense of community. You can ask anybody around you, at any particular time, for anything, and they will happily help you out.”<br></p><p>The 32-year-old South African bought his 36ft-narrowboat six years ago for £14,000 as a way out of London’s rental trap. “My parents cashed in some shares and gave me the money to buy outright. I went from paying £80 a week in rent and sharing a room with a friend in Finsbury Park to having my own place.”</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/apr/24/canals-alternative-london-property-ladder">Continue reading...</a>

Canals offer alternative to London property ladder

Apr 24, 2017 9:56

The capital’s waterways give a growing number of residents affordable berths

Richard Hagan knows exactly why he likes living on a narrowboat on London’s canals. “It’s the sense of community. You can ask anybody around you, at any particular time, for anything, and they will happily help you out.”

The 32-year-old South African bought his 36ft-narrowboat six years ago for £14,000 as a way out of London’s rental trap. “My parents cashed in some shares and gave me the money to buy outright. I went from paying £80 a week in rent and sharing a room with a friend in Finsbury Park to having my own place.”

Continue reading...

<p>Too many housing associations have focused on being developers. They have lost sight of their mission to provide good homes at genuinely affordable prices</p><p>I recently spoke at a large meeting, organised by Westminster North MP Karen Buck, of angry tenants and shared owners from a housing association. </p><p>They fumed about poor repair services, high rents, shoddy standards in new homes, and the enormous salary of their association’s chief executive. They were the embodiment of the issues raised by John Harris in his recent <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/apr/11/housing-associations-face-storm-of-complaints-over-new-build-homes">Guardian articles</a>.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2017/apr/24/housing-associations-crisis-commercialisation">Continue reading...</a>

Housing associations have lost their way | Steve Hilditch

Apr 24, 2017 7:43

Too many housing associations have focused on being developers. They have lost sight of their mission to provide good homes at genuinely affordable prices

I recently spoke at a large meeting, organised by Westminster North MP Karen Buck, of angry tenants and shared owners from a housing association.

They fumed about poor repair services, high rents, shoddy standards in new homes, and the enormous salary of their association’s chief executive. They were the embodiment of the issues raised by John Harris in his recent Guardian articles.

Continue reading...

<p>Amounts demanded by sellers are up by 2.2% year-on-year across England and Wales, according to Rightmove </p><p>The housing market continues to defy fears of a post-referendum slump after sellers’ asking prices hit a new record high of more than £313,000 on average in April.</p><p>Across England and Wales, the average price tag on a property being put on the market increased by £3,547 – or 1.1% month-on-month – to reach £313,655. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/apr/24/asking-prices-for-homes-rise-to-record-average-of-313655">Continue reading...</a>

Asking prices for homes rise to record average of £313,655

Apr 24, 2017 7:00

Amounts demanded by sellers are up by 2.2% year-on-year across England and Wales, according to Rightmove

The housing market continues to defy fears of a post-referendum slump after sellers’ asking prices hit a new record high of more than £313,000 on average in April.

Across England and Wales, the average price tag on a property being put on the market increased by £3,547 – or 1.1% month-on-month – to reach £313,655.

Continue reading...

<p>Sadiq Khan adds weight to scheme to construct spartan apartments that will sell for up to 40% less than usual new-builds</p><p>Who needs internal walls or a fitted kitchen anyway? As house prices soar ever further out of reach, London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, is to subsidise a new generation of ultra-basic “naked” homes that will sell for up to 40% less than standard new builds.</p><p>The apartments will have no partition walls, no flooring and wall finishes, only basic plumbing and absolutely no decoration. The only recognisable part of a kitchen will be a sink. The upside of this spartan approach is a price tag of between £150,000 and £340,000, in reach for buyers on average incomes in a city where the average home now costs £580,000.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/apr/24/mayor-subsidise-naked-homes-london-housing-crisis-sadiq-khan-new-builds">Continue reading...</a>

Mayor to subsidise 'naked' homes solution to London housing crisis

Apr 24, 2017 7:00

Sadiq Khan adds weight to scheme to construct spartan apartments that will sell for up to 40% less than usual new-builds

Who needs internal walls or a fitted kitchen anyway? As house prices soar ever further out of reach, London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, is to subsidise a new generation of ultra-basic “naked” homes that will sell for up to 40% less than standard new builds.

The apartments will have no partition walls, no flooring and wall finishes, only basic plumbing and absolutely no decoration. The only recognisable part of a kitchen will be a sink. The upside of this spartan approach is a price tag of between £150,000 and £340,000, in reach for buyers on average incomes in a city where the average home now costs £580,000.

Continue reading...

<p>In 2010 David Willetts illuminated the equality divide between young and old. Since then things have only got worse</p><p>Seven years ago, a new set of contour lines emerged in our understanding of inequality in Britain. The publication of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/feb/07/the-pinch-david-willetts" title="">The Pinch by David Willetts</a> has shaped the way we map, measure and articulate inequality: not just in terms of the gap between the rich and the poor, but in terms of the divide between the young and the old.</p><p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/apr/26/david-willetts-life-determined-bells-attendance" title="">Lord Willetts’</a> arguments have since become well rehearsed. The baby boomer generation have collectively done much better financially than the generations that came before them. They will have drawn more out of the welfare state than they paid in as a generation; have done exceedingly well out of accelerating house-price growth; and can look forward to a comfortable retirement on generous defined-benefit pensions. But this has come at the expense of the younger generation, which finds itself struggling to even get on the housing ladder, and financially propping up both the welfare state and pensions schemes that the older generation are drawing down on.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/apr/23/the-guardian-view-on-generational-inequality-a-country-fit-for-all-ages">Continue reading...</a>

The Guardian view on generational inequality: a country fit for all ages | Editorial

Apr 23, 2017 19:56

In 2010 David Willetts illuminated the equality divide between young and old. Since then things have only got worse

Seven years ago, a new set of contour lines emerged in our understanding of inequality in Britain. The publication of The Pinch by David Willetts has shaped the way we map, measure and articulate inequality: not just in terms of the gap between the rich and the poor, but in terms of the divide between the young and the old.

Lord Willetts’ arguments have since become well rehearsed. The baby boomer generation have collectively done much better financially than the generations that came before them. They will have drawn more out of the welfare state than they paid in as a generation; have done exceedingly well out of accelerating house-price growth; and can look forward to a comfortable retirement on generous defined-benefit pensions. But this has come at the expense of the younger generation, which finds itself struggling to even get on the housing ladder, and financially propping up both the welfare state and pensions schemes that the older generation are drawing down on.

Continue reading...

<p>Eye-catching new loan deals are attracting first-time buyers in larger numbers: but the parallels with 2007 are growing increasingly uncomfortable</p><p>One way to help homebuyers overcome the affordability gap is to cut the cost of borrowing. At a time when the mortgage loan-to-income ratio is back at 2007 levels, homebuyers need all the help they can get. And that is <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/apr/21/yorkshire-building-society-launches-record-low-uk-mortgage-rate" title="">just what the Yorkshire building society has done</a>.</p><p>Admittedly the borrower must have a 35% deposit and pay a £1,495 fee upfront, but still, someone with a £200,000 mortgage will repay just £744 a month on a 25-year term, compared with £1,123 on the building society’s standard variable rate of 4.6%.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/apr/23/mortgage-market-lower-rates-tight-margins-worryingly-familiar">Continue reading...</a>

Low rates, tight margins: the mortgage market looks worryingly familiar

Apr 23, 2017 7:00

Eye-catching new loan deals are attracting first-time buyers in larger numbers: but the parallels with 2007 are growing increasingly uncomfortable

One way to help homebuyers overcome the affordability gap is to cut the cost of borrowing. At a time when the mortgage loan-to-income ratio is back at 2007 levels, homebuyers need all the help they can get. And that is just what the Yorkshire building society has done.

Admittedly the borrower must have a 35% deposit and pay a £1,495 fee upfront, but still, someone with a £200,000 mortgage will repay just £744 a month on a 25-year term, compared with £1,123 on the building society’s standard variable rate of 4.6%.

Continue reading...

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