DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

The thief passed the sensor but it apparently was on a ‘pet sensitive’ setting<p><strong>I was burgled recently and lost my laptop and PlayStation. My home alarm was on and in working condition (confirmed by ADT), but it didn’t activate despite burglars passing a sensor. I have since found out that this was because my alarm sensor was set up to be “pet sensitive”. I have no pets and ticked this on the contract. We did a test and my 6ft husband could move past the sensor upright on his knees (at a height of 1.3m) without it activating. </strong></p><p><strong>I am furious. I paid £139 for installation in July 2015 and have been paying £27 a month since for a product that essentially never worked. I have been trying to call the company but have been put on hold countless times. </strong><em>AW,</em> <em>Chingford, Essex</em></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/sep/26/adt-burglar-alarm-did-not-work-thief-pet-setting">Continue reading...</a>

ADT burglar alarm stayed silent while I was being robbed

Sep 26, 2017 7:00

The thief passed the sensor but it apparently was on a ‘pet sensitive’ setting

I was burgled recently and lost my laptop and PlayStation. My home alarm was on and in working condition (confirmed by ADT), but it didn’t activate despite burglars passing a sensor. I have since found out that this was because my alarm sensor was set up to be “pet sensitive”. I have no pets and ticked this on the contract. We did a test and my 6ft husband could move past the sensor upright on his knees (at a height of 1.3m) without it activating.

I am furious. I paid £139 for installation in July 2015 and have been paying £27 a month since for a product that essentially never worked. I have been trying to call the company but have been put on hold countless times. AW, Chingford, Essex

Continue reading...

<p>A Grade II-listed former ferryman’s cottage could be yours for just £15,000</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/sep/26/a-piece-of-history-in-menai-bridge-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

A piece of history in Menai Bridge – in pictures

Sep 26, 2017 6:00

A Grade II-listed former ferryman’s cottage could be yours for just £15,000

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<p>Small islands have always been objects of desire for a certain kind of man ambitious to rule his own tiny nation. One Hebridean isle asserted its independence, but can its way of life survive? By Patrick Barkham</p><p>“It’s the difference between black-and-white TV and colour,” said Brian Greene. “That’s what it was like after the revolution.” Greene was giving me a lift in his dilapidated Peugeot along Eigg’s only road, waving at every passerby. It was the kind of explosive Highland summer day when butterflies jinked out of the steaming greenery and every foxglove, fuchsia and yellow flag iris seemed to have simultaneously burst into flower.</p><p>Small islands are like celebrities: they loom far larger than their actual size, they are pored over by visitor-fans and they become public possessions, laden with reputations and attributes they may or may not embody. The <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/may/29/eigg-island-scotland-cycling-walking-kayaking">Hebridean island of Eigg</a> is second to St Kilda as the most famous of the smaller British isles. While St Kilda is renowned for its extinction as a place of human settlement, Eigg is celebrated for its rebirth. After overthrowing its eccentric, authoritarian owner two decades ago, this 31 sq km (12 sq mile) patch of moor and mountain was reborn as what is sometimes mockingly called the People’s Republic of Eigg. This triumph of David versus Goliath has forged an apparently inspirational, sustainable community of 100 people. On first glance, it appears at once industriously creative and attractively lackadaisical: colourful houses, gardens filled with strawberry patches, hammocks made from old fishing nets and swings from old pink buoys.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/sep/26/this-island-is-not-for-sale-how-eigg-fought-back">Continue reading...</a>

This island is not for sale: how Eigg fought back

Sep 26, 2017 6:00

Small islands have always been objects of desire for a certain kind of man ambitious to rule his own tiny nation. One Hebridean isle asserted its independence, but can its way of life survive? By Patrick Barkham

“It’s the difference between black-and-white TV and colour,” said Brian Greene. “That’s what it was like after the revolution.” Greene was giving me a lift in his dilapidated Peugeot along Eigg’s only road, waving at every passerby. It was the kind of explosive Highland summer day when butterflies jinked out of the steaming greenery and every foxglove, fuchsia and yellow flag iris seemed to have simultaneously burst into flower.

Small islands are like celebrities: they loom far larger than their actual size, they are pored over by visitor-fans and they become public possessions, laden with reputations and attributes they may or may not embody. The Hebridean island of Eigg is second to St Kilda as the most famous of the smaller British isles. While St Kilda is renowned for its extinction as a place of human settlement, Eigg is celebrated for its rebirth. After overthrowing its eccentric, authoritarian owner two decades ago, this 31 sq km (12 sq mile) patch of moor and mountain was reborn as what is sometimes mockingly called the People’s Republic of Eigg. This triumph of David versus Goliath has forged an apparently inspirational, sustainable community of 100 people. On first glance, it appears at once industriously creative and attractively lackadaisical: colourful houses, gardens filled with strawberry patches, hammocks made from old fishing nets and swings from old pink buoys.

Continue reading...

<p>I have a high BMI and think I’d be turned down for cover</p><p><strong>Q</strong> I have been reading articles regarding mortgage life insurance cover. Unfortunately I have a higher-than-wanted body mass index (BMI) count, and from what I’ve read I believe I would find it hard to get insurance.</p><p>If I wanted to sell my existing property and buy a new place, but couldn’t get mortgage life insurance due to my BMI, is it compulsory to have cover to be accepted for a mortgage? Would my lender still lend to me if I earn enough to pay the mortgage? <strong>AM</strong></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/sep/25/is-mortgage-protection-insurance-necessary-when-buying-a-house">Continue reading...</a>

Is mortgage protection insurance necessary when buying a house?

Sep 25, 2017 15:12

I have a high BMI and think I’d be turned down for cover

Q I have been reading articles regarding mortgage life insurance cover. Unfortunately I have a higher-than-wanted body mass index (BMI) count, and from what I’ve read I believe I would find it hard to get insurance.

If I wanted to sell my existing property and buy a new place, but couldn’t get mortgage life insurance due to my BMI, is it compulsory to have cover to be accepted for a mortgage? Would my lender still lend to me if I earn enough to pay the mortgage? AM

Continue reading...

The firm’s new tool for assessing flood risk could see home premiums soar, as one reader  with a £1,000 policy discovered<p>When Paul Barlow from south London opened his latest home insurance renewal quote from Direct Line, he was staggered by the increase in the premium. The year before the insurer had charged just £189 for his property: a ground-floor, two-bed flat he rents out in Bermondsey, near Tower Bridge. But this year it wanted £1,025 – an increase of 442%. When he rang, thinking it must be some sort of mistake, the representative said he was lucky because if he had been a new customer the insurer would have turned him down entirely.</p><p>Barlow’s home is not in some hell-hole location where burglary is rife; he has not been making large claims for subsidence or other matters that usually make insurers hike premiums. What Barlow has fallen victim to is a new flood-mapping tool used by Direct Line called geospatial analysis, which attempts to assess flood risk with pinpoint accuracy and could see huge premium increases for thousands of other homes, not just in the capital but all over the UK.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/sep/23/direct-line-home-insurance-up-assessing-flood-risk">Continue reading...</a>

Direct Line, why has my home insurance gone up by 442% in one year?

Sep 23, 2017 6:59

The firm’s new tool for assessing flood risk could see home premiums soar, as one reader with a £1,000 policy discovered

When Paul Barlow from south London opened his latest home insurance renewal quote from Direct Line, he was staggered by the increase in the premium. The year before the insurer had charged just £189 for his property: a ground-floor, two-bed flat he rents out in Bermondsey, near Tower Bridge. But this year it wanted £1,025 – an increase of 442%. When he rang, thinking it must be some sort of mistake, the representative said he was lucky because if he had been a new customer the insurer would have turned him down entirely.

Barlow’s home is not in some hell-hole location where burglary is rife; he has not been making large claims for subsidence or other matters that usually make insurers hike premiums. What Barlow has fallen victim to is a new flood-mapping tool used by Direct Line called geospatial analysis, which attempts to assess flood risk with pinpoint accuracy and could see huge premium increases for thousands of other homes, not just in the capital but all over the UK.

Continue reading...

<p>Paul McCartney came here to get away from Beatlemania, and it’s still the perfect place to escape</p><p><strong>What’s going for it? </strong>OK, let’s get <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/music/paulmccartney">Paul McCartney</a> and <a href="https://vimeo.com/65937572">That Song</a> out of the way straight off the bat. Millions of lives were tragically blighted in the 70s by Mull Of Kintyre, number one in the pop charts for about 47 years. Watching the video with wiser, middle-aged eyes, though, I appreciate it anew. Not the dirge. That still plods like a knackered horse. But the place. Look behind Paul and the bagpipers: that’s Saddell Bay, north of the Mull. Gorgeous, isn’t it? No wonder McCartney bought High Park Farm up here in the 60s to escape Beatlemania, grow a beard, learn how to milk sheep and love mud, like some kind of proto-downshifting-hipster. He doesn’t come much any more, but the Kintyre peninsula – 20 miles of heather, <a href="https://witness.theguardian.com/assignment/56fbf274e4b0597b15f4e76d/1977753">oystercatchers</a>, astonishing beaches and a fair few whisky distilleries dangling from Britain by a thread – still feels the perfect place to escape the universe. All together now, “Muuuuuuull of Kintyre…”</p><p><strong>The case against </strong>That song will roll around your head <em>for ever</em>. The Mull of Kintyre Test (<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mull_of_Kintyre_test">Google it</a>). It’s a long way from anything but the Isle of Arran.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/sep/22/lets-move-kintyre-peninsula-argyll-bute-gorgeous">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to the Kintyre peninsula, Argyll and Bute: ‘Gorgeous, isn’t it?’

Sep 22, 2017 16:29

Paul McCartney came here to get away from Beatlemania, and it’s still the perfect place to escape

What’s going for it? OK, let’s get Paul McCartney and That Song out of the way straight off the bat. Millions of lives were tragically blighted in the 70s by Mull Of Kintyre, number one in the pop charts for about 47 years. Watching the video with wiser, middle-aged eyes, though, I appreciate it anew. Not the dirge. That still plods like a knackered horse. But the place. Look behind Paul and the bagpipers: that’s Saddell Bay, north of the Mull. Gorgeous, isn’t it? No wonder McCartney bought High Park Farm up here in the 60s to escape Beatlemania, grow a beard, learn how to milk sheep and love mud, like some kind of proto-downshifting-hipster. He doesn’t come much any more, but the Kintyre peninsula – 20 miles of heather, oystercatchers, astonishing beaches and a fair few whisky distilleries dangling from Britain by a thread – still feels the perfect place to escape the universe. All together now, “Muuuuuuull of Kintyre…”

The case against That song will roll around your head for ever. The Mull of Kintyre Test (Google it). It’s a long way from anything but the Isle of Arran.

Continue reading...

<p>If you’re a member of generation rent, could a three-bed flat at the Barbican Centre be the answer to your dreams of a future adorned with art?</p><p>Three things are certain in life: death, taxes and black mould in the bathroom. The latter is something my ex-flatmate Alex and I argued about. The mould was growing and, despite my concerns that soon it would develop eyes and watch us while we showered, Alex was adamant we should leave it alone.</p><p>“The amount of money we give that useless landlord,” he insisted, “I&nbsp;am not spending a penny to fix what he should.”</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/sep/22/all-the-places-i-will-never-live-art-space-property">Continue reading...</a>

All the places I’ll never live: an art space

Sep 22, 2017 13:00

If you’re a member of generation rent, could a three-bed flat at the Barbican Centre be the answer to your dreams of a future adorned with art?

Three things are certain in life: death, taxes and black mould in the bathroom. The latter is something my ex-flatmate Alex and I argued about. The mould was growing and, despite my concerns that soon it would develop eyes and watch us while we showered, Alex was adamant we should leave it alone.

“The amount of money we give that useless landlord,” he insisted, “I am not spending a penny to fix what he should.”

Continue reading...

<p>Also, one driver’s legal victory over ParkingEye and the part-time working revolution<br></p><ul><li>To get Money Talks delivered to your inbox sign up <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2015/nov/10/sign-up-to-the-guardians-money-email">here</a></li></ul><p>Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/sep/21/young-people-worst-hit-debt-crisis-london-house-prices-dive">Continue reading...</a>

Young people worst hit by debt crisis, plus London house prices dive

Sep 21, 2017 15:27

Also, one driver’s legal victory over ParkingEye and the part-time working revolution

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Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.

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<p>DCLG estimates that 1.4m houses and 2.9m flats have been sold with such contracts as government considers ban on new sales by developers</p><p>The number of leasehold houses in England is significantly higher than previously estimated, according to <a draggable="true" href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/estimating-the-number-of-leasehold-dwellings-in-england-2015-to-2016">new government figures</a> released before an expected ban on future sales by developers.</p><p>The Department for Communities and Local Government said there were 1.4m leasehold houses in England in 2015-16, compared with the previous estimate of 1.2m in 2014-15, following a change in methodology to include socially rented properties. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/sep/21/new-figures-reveal-scale-of-controversial-leasehold-homes">Continue reading...</a>

New figures reveal scale of controversial leasehold homes

Sep 21, 2017 15:00

DCLG estimates that 1.4m houses and 2.9m flats have been sold with such contracts as government considers ban on new sales by developers

The number of leasehold houses in England is significantly higher than previously estimated, according to new government figures released before an expected ban on future sales by developers.

The Department for Communities and Local Government said there were 1.4m leasehold houses in England in 2015-16, compared with the previous estimate of 1.2m in 2014-15, following a change in methodology to include socially rented properties.

Continue reading...

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