DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Almost implausibly perfect, its film-star beauty never fades</p><p><strong>What’s going for it?</strong> If you have a sense of deja vu in Stamford, it’s probably because you have deja vu-ed these streets before. Film crews after that Merrie-Olde-Englande-before-factories-and-uppity-plebs-ruined-everything look are 10 a&nbsp;penny here. The industrial revolution bypassed <a href="http://www.visitlincolnshire.com/content/stamford">Stamford</a> when local nob the Marquess of Exeter lobbied for the railway to go via Peterborough instead. In the 1960s they got a bypass, declared Stamford England’s first conservation area, and listed 600 buildings. Today, this is our Finest Historic Stone Town. You can’t move for heritage trails, plaques and costumed extras in bustles. True, the 21st century has seeped in; there is a Holland &amp; Barrett, a bus station, and fine <a href="https://www.stamfordartscentre.com/">arts centre</a> (though, sadly, the Greggs shut last year), but even new executive homes look as if they’re expecting the Dowager Countess of Grantham for tea.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> One can tire of honey-hued stone, of perfection. One can even miss Greggs.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/nov/17/lets-move-to-stamford-lincolnshire">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Stamford, Lincolnshire: it’s a real-life Jane Austen set

Nov 17, 2017 16:30

Almost implausibly perfect, its film-star beauty never fades

What’s going for it? If you have a sense of deja vu in Stamford, it’s probably because you have deja vu-ed these streets before. Film crews after that Merrie-Olde-Englande-before-factories-and-uppity-plebs-ruined-everything look are 10 a penny here. The industrial revolution bypassed Stamford when local nob the Marquess of Exeter lobbied for the railway to go via Peterborough instead. In the 1960s they got a bypass, declared Stamford England’s first conservation area, and listed 600 buildings. Today, this is our Finest Historic Stone Town. You can’t move for heritage trails, plaques and costumed extras in bustles. True, the 21st century has seeped in; there is a Holland & Barrett, a bus station, and fine arts centre (though, sadly, the Greggs shut last year), but even new executive homes look as if they’re expecting the Dowager Countess of Grantham for tea.

The case against One can tire of honey-hued stone, of perfection. One can even miss Greggs.

Continue reading...

<p>Attracting a great flatmate would be much easier with a house like this</p><p>Flatmates are a wonderful thing. Find the right ones and you can have a friend, or proxy family, for life – there to share costs and the burden of chores, and to be the unexpected company you need after&nbsp;a tough day.</p><p>But choose the wrong ones and life can be an ordeal of sleepless nights, fines for late payments and snarky Post-it notes. It’s a lot of pressure on a snap decision made in&nbsp;less than half an hour at the flatmate interview.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/nov/17/generation-rent-kitchen-swimming-pool">Continue reading...</a>

Generation rent: why I’ll never live in a mansion with a kitchen swimming pool

Nov 17, 2017 13:59

Attracting a great flatmate would be much easier with a house like this

Flatmates are a wonderful thing. Find the right ones and you can have a friend, or proxy family, for life – there to share costs and the burden of chores, and to be the unexpected company you need after a tough day.

But choose the wrong ones and life can be an ordeal of sleepless nights, fines for late payments and snarky Post-it notes. It’s a lot of pressure on a snap decision made in less than half an hour at the flatmate interview.

Continue reading...

<p>Building society warns ‘sluggish’ economy, Brexit uncertainty, weak wage increases and rising inflation are hurting customers’ finances</p><p>Household finances are under worsening pressure, according to Nationwide building society, which reported a fall in profits and warned of tougher trading conditions ahead.</p><p>Total mortgage lending slipped from £17.5bn to £16.7bn, largely because of a steep decline in loans for buy-to-let following the<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jun/22/buy-to-let-uk-property-sales-fall-by-almost-50-in-a-year"> tax changes</a>. But as lending for landlords has fallen, loans granted to first-time buyers have surged. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/nov/17/household-finances-under-strain-as-nationwide-warns-of-tough-times-ahead">Continue reading...</a>

Household finances under strain as Nationwide warns of tough times ahead

Nov 17, 2017 13:57

Building society warns ‘sluggish’ economy, Brexit uncertainty, weak wage increases and rising inflation are hurting customers’ finances

Household finances are under worsening pressure, according to Nationwide building society, which reported a fall in profits and warned of tougher trading conditions ahead.

Total mortgage lending slipped from £17.5bn to £16.7bn, largely because of a steep decline in loans for buy-to-let following the tax changes. But as lending for landlords has fallen, loans granted to first-time buyers have surged.

Continue reading...

He’s taken sides with millennials, in a debate that has become about avocados. If he wanted to solve the housing ‘crisis’ he would boost social housing<p>If in doubt, blame someone else. Sajid Javid’s solution to the “housing crisis” is to accuse the baby-boomer bourgeoisie of south-east England of antagonising “avocado-eating millennials”. He says the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/16/sajid-javid-defends-millennials-housing-market-avocados" title="">baby boomers are impeding new houses in the countryside</a> and rendering his Tory-deserting millennials “rootless and resentful of both capitalism and politicians”. What rubbish.</p><p>New building is under 10% of the housing market, and has never made a measurable impact on house prices. New housing in green belts would be a tiny fraction of even that figure. As for the number of these actually being “blocked by baby boomers”, it must be trivial.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/17/baby-boomers-sajid-javid-young-people-millennials-social-housing">Continue reading...</a>

Blaming baby boomers won’t put roofs over young people’s heads, Sajid | Simon Jenkins

Nov 17, 2017 10:45

He’s taken sides with millennials, in a debate that has become about avocados. If he wanted to solve the housing ‘crisis’ he would boost social housing

If in doubt, blame someone else. Sajid Javid’s solution to the “housing crisis” is to accuse the baby-boomer bourgeoisie of south-east England of antagonising “avocado-eating millennials”. He says the baby boomers are impeding new houses in the countryside and rendering his Tory-deserting millennials “rootless and resentful of both capitalism and politicians”. What rubbish.

New building is under 10% of the housing market, and has never made a measurable impact on house prices. New housing in green belts would be a tiny fraction of even that figure. As for the number of these actually being “blocked by baby boomers”, it must be trivial.

Continue reading...

<p>Pray silence for a wonderfully unique offering …</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/nov/17/two-cottages-and-a-chapel-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Two cottages and a chapel – in pictures

Nov 17, 2017 6:30

Pray silence for a wonderfully unique offering …

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<p>Communities secretary criticises baby boomers who have long paid off their mortgages for saying young people are too profligate to own property</p><p>The communities secretary, Sajid Javid, has lambasted baby boomers who believe young people could afford a home if they cut back on nights out and avocados, saying such critics were out of touch with a broken housing system.</p><p>Javid warned that without urgent action to make homes more affordable, an entire generation could becomes rootless, and resentful of both capitalism and politicians.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/16/sajid-javid-defends-millennials-housing-market-avocados">Continue reading...</a>

'£90k is a lot of avocados': Javid defends millennials who can't afford a home

Nov 16, 2017 15:08

Communities secretary criticises baby boomers who have long paid off their mortgages for saying young people are too profligate to own property

The communities secretary, Sajid Javid, has lambasted baby boomers who believe young people could afford a home if they cut back on nights out and avocados, saying such critics were out of touch with a broken housing system.

Javid warned that without urgent action to make homes more affordable, an entire generation could becomes rootless, and resentful of both capitalism and politicians.

Continue reading...

<p>Unlike in other countries, Japanese homes become valueless over time – but as the population shrinks, can its cities finally learn to slow down and refurb?</p><p>In the suburban neighbourhood of Midorigaoka, about an hour by train outside Kobe, Japan, all the houses were built by the same company in the same factory. Steel frames fitted out with panel walls and ceilings, these homes were clustered by the hundreds into what was once a brand new commuter town. But they weren’t built to last. </p><p>Daiwa House, one of the biggest prefabricated housing manufacturers in Japan, built this town in the 60s during a postwar housing boom. It’s not unlike the suburban subdivisions of the western world, with porches, balconies and rooflines that shift and repeat up and down blocks of gently curving roads. Most of those houses built in the 60s are no longer standing, having long since been replaced by newer models, finished with fake brick ceramic siding in beiges, pinks and browns. In the end, most of these prefabricated houses – and indeed most houses in Japan – have a lifespan of only about 30 years. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/nov/16/japan-reusable-housing-revolution">Continue reading...</a>

Raze, rebuild, repeat: why Japan knocks down its houses after 30 years

Nov 16, 2017 7:29

Unlike in other countries, Japanese homes become valueless over time – but as the population shrinks, can its cities finally learn to slow down and refurb?

In the suburban neighbourhood of Midorigaoka, about an hour by train outside Kobe, Japan, all the houses were built by the same company in the same factory. Steel frames fitted out with panel walls and ceilings, these homes were clustered by the hundreds into what was once a brand new commuter town. But they weren’t built to last.

Daiwa House, one of the biggest prefabricated housing manufacturers in Japan, built this town in the 60s during a postwar housing boom. It’s not unlike the suburban subdivisions of the western world, with porches, balconies and rooflines that shift and repeat up and down blocks of gently curving roads. Most of those houses built in the 60s are no longer standing, having long since been replaced by newer models, finished with fake brick ceramic siding in beiges, pinks and browns. In the end, most of these prefabricated houses – and indeed most houses in Japan – have a lifespan of only about 30 years.

Continue reading...

<p>Goggle at these … from Scotland to Austria and France they’re poles apart in what they offer, except you’ll need your boots at all of them</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/nov/15/homes-near-ski-slopes-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes near ski slopes – in pictures

Nov 15, 2017 7:00

Goggle at these … from Scotland to Austria and France they’re poles apart in what they offer, except you’ll need your boots at all of them

Continue reading...

<p>Housebuilder says demand for housing still high, supported by government’s help-to-buy scheme </p><p>The “substantial majority” of Taylor Wimpey homebuyers caught in the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jul/25/leasehold-houses-and-the-ground-rent-scandal-all-you-need-to-know">ground rents scandal</a> will be able to switch to less onerous leasehold contracts, the housebuilder has said after it set aside £130m to convert the controversial leases.</p><p>In an upbeat trading statement that contrasted with a more pessimistic report by its rival Persimmon last week, Taylor Wimpey said sales per outlet had risen, and that it expected to be able to hand shareholders £500m in dividends in 2018. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/nov/13/taylor-wimpey-ground-rent-scandal-help-to-buy">Continue reading...</a>

Taylor Wimpey: most buyers in ground rent scandal will be able to get new deals

Nov 13, 2017 19:51

Housebuilder says demand for housing still high, supported by government’s help-to-buy scheme

The “substantial majority” of Taylor Wimpey homebuyers caught in the ground rents scandal will be able to switch to less onerous leasehold contracts, the housebuilder has said after it set aside £130m to convert the controversial leases.

In an upbeat trading statement that contrasted with a more pessimistic report by its rival Persimmon last week, Taylor Wimpey said sales per outlet had risen, and that it expected to be able to hand shareholders £500m in dividends in 2018.

Continue reading...

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