DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>With graduates unable to afford their own home, more parents are building extensions to house their boomerang offspring</p><p>Granny flats are not what they used to be – today they are increasingly likely to be filled by a millennial desperate for their own space. With nearly <a draggable="true" href="https://www.nus.org.uk/en/news/press-releases/almost-half-of-2015-graduates-have-moved-back-in-with-parents/">half the graduates who paid full tuition fees in 2015 back living</a> with their parents, plus all the other young adults unable to get a foot on the property ladder, there has been a boom in so-called “graddy annexes” to accommodate young people moving home.</p><p>According to reports, the number of homes with an annexe for family members has jumped by a third in the past two years – thanks to <a href="http://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/granny-moves-over-for-graddy-annexe-nbfwccr6r">council tax breaks for those building to house relatives</a>. Before April 2014, homeowners had to pay full council tax on annexes attached to a main household if they had fitted kitchens or bathrooms. But now there is a 50% discount on council tax bills if the occupier is a family member.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/shortcuts/2017/feb/21/rise-of-the-graddy-annexe-graduates-moving-back-home">Continue reading...</a>

Move over granny: the ‘graddy annexe’ is on the rise

Feb 21, 2017 15:18

With graduates unable to afford their own home, more parents are building extensions to house their boomerang offspring

Granny flats are not what they used to be – today they are increasingly likely to be filled by a millennial desperate for their own space. With nearly half the graduates who paid full tuition fees in 2015 back living with their parents, plus all the other young adults unable to get a foot on the property ladder, there has been a boom in so-called “graddy annexes” to accommodate young people moving home.

According to reports, the number of homes with an annexe for family members has jumped by a third in the past two years – thanks to council tax breaks for those building to house relatives. Before April 2014, homeowners had to pay full council tax on annexes attached to a main household if they had fitted kitchens or bathrooms. But now there is a 50% discount on council tax bills if the occupier is a family member.

Continue reading...

<p>Housebuilder apologises for poor quality of some properties as dissatisfied owners organise protests</p><ul><li><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/20/are-you-a-bovis-home-owner-awaiting-compensation"> Are you a Bovis homeowner awaiting compensation? </a></li></ul><p>Bovis Homes is to pay £7m to repair poorly built new homes sold to customers, raising fresh questions about the standards of new-build properties across the country and the regulation of the market.</p><p>The company – one of the biggest housebuilders builders in Britain – will pay compensation after angry customers formed a Facebook group accusing Bovis of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jan/11/bovis-accused-of-pressurising-buyers-to-move-into-unfinished-homes">pressuring them to move in to incomplete houses</a> so it could hit sales targets.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/20/bovis-to-pay-7m-to-compensate-customers-angry-at-poorly-built-homes">Continue reading...</a>

Bovis to pay £7m to compensate customers for poorly built homes

Feb 20, 2017 10:23

Housebuilder apologises for poor quality of some properties as dissatisfied owners organise protests

Bovis Homes is to pay £7m to repair poorly built new homes sold to customers, raising fresh questions about the standards of new-build properties across the country and the regulation of the market.

The company – one of the biggest housebuilders builders in Britain – will pay compensation after angry customers formed a Facebook group accusing Bovis of pressuring them to move in to incomplete houses so it could hit sales targets.

Continue reading...

<p>Annual price rise falls to 2.3% in February as buyers become wary of paying over the odds, report by Rightmove says</p><p>Asking prices in Britain’s housing market rose at the slowest annual rate in almost four years in February as buyers become wary about paying too much, according to the latest survey from Rightmove.</p><p>Annual price growth fell from 3.2% in January to 2.3%, the weakest since April 2013. On a monthly basis, average asking prices rose 2% t0 £306,213, the slowest rate of growth in the month of February in eight years.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/20/uk-house-prices-growth-slowest-rate-four-years-rightmove-survey">Continue reading...</a>

UK house price growth at slowest rate in four years

Feb 20, 2017 7:01

Annual price rise falls to 2.3% in February as buyers become wary of paying over the odds, report by Rightmove says

Asking prices in Britain’s housing market rose at the slowest annual rate in almost four years in February as buyers become wary about paying too much, according to the latest survey from Rightmove.

Annual price growth fell from 3.2% in January to 2.3%, the weakest since April 2013. On a monthly basis, average asking prices rose 2% t0 £306,213, the slowest rate of growth in the month of February in eight years.

Continue reading...

<p>Capital’s most expensive apartment is one of new breed of ultra-luxurious properties aimed at cash-splashing global super-rich</p><p>It may cost £60,000 a week to rent, but London’s most expensive flat does come with a butler, a choice of daily newspaper – and the use of an Aston Martin. The 448 sq metre art deco Park Lane penthouse is the costliest of a new breed of ultra-luxurious properties designed to cater for the global super-rich, who are <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/12/foreign-billionaires-london-choosing-rent-avoid-stamp-duty">choosing to rent rather than buy in London in order to avoid million pound-plus stamp duty bills</a>.</p><p>The staggering rent means that a week at the five-bedroom, five-bathroom property in the Grosvenor House Suites costs more than twice the average annual UK wage of £28,000.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/feb/18/london-penthouse-60000-weekly-rent">Continue reading...</a>

A London penthouse for £60,000. No, not to buy – that's the weekly rent

Feb 18, 2017 9:00

Capital’s most expensive apartment is one of new breed of ultra-luxurious properties aimed at cash-splashing global super-rich

It may cost £60,000 a week to rent, but London’s most expensive flat does come with a butler, a choice of daily newspaper – and the use of an Aston Martin. The 448 sq metre art deco Park Lane penthouse is the costliest of a new breed of ultra-luxurious properties designed to cater for the global super-rich, who are choosing to rent rather than buy in London in order to avoid million pound-plus stamp duty bills.

The staggering rent means that a week at the five-bedroom, five-bathroom property in the Grosvenor House Suites costs more than twice the average annual UK wage of £28,000.

Continue reading...

<p>You’ll be in business in no time if you choose one of these properties, from the Scottish Borders to Cornwall<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/feb/17/homes-that-generate-income-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes that generate income – in pictures

Feb 17, 2017 23:45

You’ll be in business in no time if you choose one of these properties, from the Scottish Borders to Cornwall

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<p>It hums with independent shops, pubs, restaurants, museums, microbreweries, an eco-suburb and even a walking festival</p><p>W<strong>hat’s going for it?</strong> As the isolated and only children know too well, when you have nobody else to talk to, you must make your own entertainment. Bishop’s Castle, all alone out near the Welsh border, has had centuries to perfect the art of entertaining yourself. This pretty town bursts with enthusiasm. There may be barely 2,000 souls here, but goodness they’re industrious. Bishop’s Castle hums with independent shops, cafes, pubs, restaurants, B&amp;Bs, two (<em>two</em>!) microbreweries, museums of rural life <em>and</em> railways, a weekly market, an eco-suburb, and I&nbsp;haven’t even got on to sports and recreation, let alone the <a href="http://walkingfestival.co.uk/">walking festival</a>. The town has long attracted alternative types, as my granny called them: artists, writers, the long-haired and crafty, the kind who can whittle the Cutty Sark from a&nbsp;twig. There was a horrifying spate of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yarn_bombing">yarn bombing</a> last autumn. If anyone asked them, I’m sure this lot could work out Brexit after a&nbsp;community meeting or five; but, keeping itself to itself, Bishop’s Castle instead makes a perfect spot to escape the world as it self-destructs, and indulge, perhaps, in a little <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/mar/12/modern-macrame-craft-interiors-portland-emily-katz">macramé</a>.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> No castle (well, a wall). No bishop. Say goodbye to metropolitan pleasures. Far, far from anything but <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2015/oct/23/lets-move-to-church-stretton-shropshire-hills-tom-dyckhoff">Church Stretton</a>.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/feb/17/lets-move-to-bishops-castle-shropshire-pretty-town-enthusiasm">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Bishop’s Castle, Shropshire: ‘This pretty town bursts with enthusiasm’

Feb 17, 2017 16:30

It hums with independent shops, pubs, restaurants, museums, microbreweries, an eco-suburb and even a walking festival

What’s going for it? As the isolated and only children know too well, when you have nobody else to talk to, you must make your own entertainment. Bishop’s Castle, all alone out near the Welsh border, has had centuries to perfect the art of entertaining yourself. This pretty town bursts with enthusiasm. There may be barely 2,000 souls here, but goodness they’re industrious. Bishop’s Castle hums with independent shops, cafes, pubs, restaurants, B&Bs, two (two!) microbreweries, museums of rural life and railways, a weekly market, an eco-suburb, and I haven’t even got on to sports and recreation, let alone the walking festival. The town has long attracted alternative types, as my granny called them: artists, writers, the long-haired and crafty, the kind who can whittle the Cutty Sark from a twig. There was a horrifying spate of yarn bombing last autumn. If anyone asked them, I’m sure this lot could work out Brexit after a community meeting or five; but, keeping itself to itself, Bishop’s Castle instead makes a perfect spot to escape the world as it self-destructs, and indulge, perhaps, in a little macramé.

The case against No castle (well, a wall). No bishop. Say goodbye to metropolitan pleasures. Far, far from anything but Church Stretton.

Continue reading...

<p>Rate rises opposed by 17 groups in a letter over clause that could block appeals from small companies </p><p>The government has mounted a staunch defence of the shakeup in business rates, after Britain’s biggest business groups strongly condemned the changes.</p><p>Thirteen major business groups, including the CBI, British Retail Consortium (BRC) and the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), have joined four professional groups to sign a letter sent by a law firm to the government opposing the changes. In particular, they are worried that small firms could be blocked from appealing against rate rises and have asked for that clause to be dropped on the grounds it is potentially unlawful.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/feb/17/uk-business-rates-battle-hots-up-as-firms-challenge-government">Continue reading...</a>

UK business rates battle hots up as firms challenge government

Feb 17, 2017 11:52

Rate rises opposed by 17 groups in a letter over clause that could block appeals from small companies

The government has mounted a staunch defence of the shakeup in business rates, after Britain’s biggest business groups strongly condemned the changes.

Thirteen major business groups, including the CBI, British Retail Consortium (BRC) and the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), have joined four professional groups to sign a letter sent by a law firm to the government opposing the changes. In particular, they are worried that small firms could be blocked from appealing against rate rises and have asked for that clause to be dropped on the grounds it is potentially unlawful.

Continue reading...

<p>With two of three towers already restored, this Herefordshire pile even comes with the chance to buy the title of lord<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/feb/17/castle-on-river-wye-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

A castle on the river Wye – in pictures

Feb 17, 2017 7:00

With two of three towers already restored, this Herefordshire pile even comes with the chance to buy the title of lord

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<p>Numbers retiring in debt in 2017 is highest for seven years with nearly 40% still owing payments for debts such as interest-only mortgages</p><p>One in four people planning to retire this year will still have a mortgage or other debts to pay off and will typically owe about £24,000, according to an insurer’s report.</p><p>The Prudential insurance company found the proportion of people who expected to retire in debt this year to be at its highest level for seven years, and that the level had risen to 44% in London.<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/feb/17/one-in-four-uk-retirees-burdened-by-unpaid-mortgage-or-other-debts">Continue reading...</a>

One in four UK retirees burdened by unpaid mortgage or other debts

Feb 17, 2017 6:49

Numbers retiring in debt in 2017 is highest for seven years with nearly 40% still owing payments for debts such as interest-only mortgages

One in four people planning to retire this year will still have a mortgage or other debts to pay off and will typically owe about £24,000, according to an insurer’s report.

The Prudential insurance company found the proportion of people who expected to retire in debt this year to be at its highest level for seven years, and that the level had risen to 44% in London.

Continue reading...

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