DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>There are tile-covered cottages, porches draped in roses, enough wisteria to fill the Albert Hall and I swear I glimpsed the reincarnation of Joan Hickson </p><p>W<strong>hat’s going for it?</strong> Was it the charming assistant at <a href="https://www.henningswine.co.uk/">Hennings wine merchants</a>? The shelf-stacker in the topographical section at the bookshop? I’m still hunting for Colonel Mustard and Professor Plum, but there are plenty of plummy-voiced antiques dealers in these towns to go on my list of suspects; let alone the rum fellows I imagine conduct their affairs behind the high walls of the illustrious <a href="https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/petworth-house-and-park">stately home</a> that run through Petworth like the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/berlinwall">Berlin Wall</a>. These neighbouring towns are straight out of central casting for Miss Marple: tile-covered cottages, porches draped in roses, enough wisteria to fill the Albert Hall and I swear I glimpsed the reincarnation of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/tvandradioblog/2012/jul/09/tv-detectives-miss-marple">Joan Hickson (<em>still </em>the definitive Jane</a> for me), picking up a korma in <a href="http://www.mystiquemasala.co.uk/index.html">Meghdoot’s</a> (“Authentic Indian Cuisine Since 1950”). Petworth lives in the shadow of The House and its Titians and Turners. Having the railway station, though, Pulborough is the more worldly of the two, the kind of place I imagine lived in, in Agatha Christie’s day, by brassy secretaries with a taste for jazz and romantic dalliances with aged wealthy widowers who should know better.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Expensive. But you expected that, didn’t you? Too lovely for their own good. Coach parties. The looming walls of the house do rather make one feel like a peasant.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/mar/24/lets-move-to-petworth-and-pulborough-west-sussex-miss-marple">Continue reading...</a>

Petworth and Pulborough, West Sussex: straight out of Miss Marple

Mar 24, 2017 16:30

There are tile-covered cottages, porches draped in roses, enough wisteria to fill the Albert Hall and I swear I glimpsed the reincarnation of Joan Hickson

What’s going for it? Was it the charming assistant at Hennings wine merchants? The shelf-stacker in the topographical section at the bookshop? I’m still hunting for Colonel Mustard and Professor Plum, but there are plenty of plummy-voiced antiques dealers in these towns to go on my list of suspects; let alone the rum fellows I imagine conduct their affairs behind the high walls of the illustrious stately home that run through Petworth like the Berlin Wall. These neighbouring towns are straight out of central casting for Miss Marple: tile-covered cottages, porches draped in roses, enough wisteria to fill the Albert Hall and I swear I glimpsed the reincarnation of Joan Hickson (still the definitive Jane for me), picking up a korma in Meghdoot’s (“Authentic Indian Cuisine Since 1950”). Petworth lives in the shadow of The House and its Titians and Turners. Having the railway station, though, Pulborough is the more worldly of the two, the kind of place I imagine lived in, in Agatha Christie’s day, by brassy secretaries with a taste for jazz and romantic dalliances with aged wealthy widowers who should know better.

The case against Expensive. But you expected that, didn’t you? Too lovely for their own good. Coach parties. The looming walls of the house do rather make one feel like a peasant.

Continue reading...

<p>On the Isle of Man lies a Victorian town house with sea views and a menhir in the garden, perfect for those seeking a prehistoric period feature</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/mar/24/home-standing-stone-isle-of-man-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

A home with a standing stone – in pictures

Mar 24, 2017 7:00

On the Isle of Man lies a Victorian town house with sea views and a menhir in the garden, perfect for those seeking a prehistoric period feature

Continue reading...

<p>Despite a near-halving in retailer’s stock market value over 16 months, are its current troubles really severe?</p><p>Panic over for Next shareholders? It’s too soon to sound the all-clear since a steeper decline in profits than <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/mar/23/next-price-rises-profits-fall-pound-brexit">last year’s 4% fall to £790m</a> is very possible this time. Chief executive Lord Wolfson also has a longer list of grumbles than usual: inflation, currencies, the squeeze on real incomes and consumers’ new love of entertainment over “stuff”. </p><p>For the time being, he won’t risk a penny of shareholders’ funds on share buy-backs in case the retailing weather turns nastier. Yet, after a near-halving in Next’s stock market value over the past 16 months, there’s a fair argument that the gloom is in the price.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/nils-pratley-on-finance/2017/mar/23/what-next-for-next-decline-if-it-comes-should-still-be-profitable">Continue reading...</a>

What next for Next? Decline, if it comes, should still be profitable | Nils Pratley

Mar 23, 2017 20:22

Despite a near-halving in retailer’s stock market value over 16 months, are its current troubles really severe?

Panic over for Next shareholders? It’s too soon to sound the all-clear since a steeper decline in profits than last year’s 4% fall to £790m is very possible this time. Chief executive Lord Wolfson also has a longer list of grumbles than usual: inflation, currencies, the squeeze on real incomes and consumers’ new love of entertainment over “stuff”.

For the time being, he won’t risk a penny of shareholders’ funds on share buy-backs in case the retailing weather turns nastier. Yet, after a near-halving in Next’s stock market value over the past 16 months, there’s a fair argument that the gloom is in the price.

Continue reading...

<p>Also, average house costs 7.6 times annual salary, part-time workers face five-fold NICs increase and for sale: Pierre Cardin’s bubble palace </p><p>Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/mar/23/london-cheaper-to-live-new-york-tokyo-viagogo-snubs-mps">Continue reading...</a>

London now 'cheaper to live than New York and Tokyo', plus Viagogo snubs MPs

Mar 23, 2017 14:25

Also, average house costs 7.6 times annual salary, part-time workers face five-fold NICs increase and for sale: Pierre Cardin’s bubble palace

Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.

Continue reading...

<p>I can afford only to rent in the area where I work, so I plan to buy a house for cash elsewhere to let to my sister</p><p><strong>Q</strong> I have a query regarding home-owning and was hoping you could help. I have rented for my whole life and have never taken out a mortgage or owned a home. I am required to stay in my rented house for my job. However, I am now in a position to buy a house in a much cheaper area for cash, which I could rent to my sister. As I won’t be taking out a mortgage, am I still required to register for self-assessment? I will use the rent I receive from my sister to pay part of the rent on the property I live in.</p><p>Of course, I know that it doesn’t seem to make sense to carry on renting myself while owning a house and letting it to another person, but I need to stay near to my work and simply could not afford to buy in the area I live. <strong>SQ </strong> </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/mar/23/do-i-need-tax-return-buy-to-let-without-a-mortgage">Continue reading...</a>

Do I need to fill out a tax return if I buy to let without a mortgage?

Mar 23, 2017 7:00

I can afford only to rent in the area where I work, so I plan to buy a house for cash elsewhere to let to my sister

Q I have a query regarding home-owning and was hoping you could help. I have rented for my whole life and have never taken out a mortgage or owned a home. I am required to stay in my rented house for my job. However, I am now in a position to buy a house in a much cheaper area for cash, which I could rent to my sister. As I won’t be taking out a mortgage, am I still required to register for self-assessment? I will use the rent I receive from my sister to pay part of the rent on the property I live in.

Of course, I know that it doesn’t seem to make sense to carry on renting myself while owning a house and letting it to another person, but I need to stay near to my work and simply could not afford to buy in the area I live. SQ

Continue reading...

<p>From air- and ground-source heat pumps to desalinating seawater, these properties flaunt their environmentally friendly credentials</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/mar/22/eco-homes-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Eco homes – in pictures

Mar 22, 2017 10:47

From air- and ground-source heat pumps to desalinating seawater, these properties flaunt their environmentally friendly credentials

Continue reading...

Secrecy surrounds much of the country’s land ownership. It’s time for the Land Registry database to be completed and opened up to all<p>“The ownership of land,” wrote the 19th-century radical <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_George" title="">economist Henry George</a>, “is the great fundamental fact which ultimately determines the social, the political and … the moral condition of a people.”</p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/31/who-owns-land-housing-crisis-land-registry-secret-ownership-of-land">The Land Registry is the guardian of our most basic national resource | Peter Hetherington</a> </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/20/take-back-control-england-land-ownership">Continue reading...</a>

Utopian thinking: to ‘take back control’ of England, we must find out who owns it | Guy Shrubsole

Mar 20, 2017 8:00

Secrecy surrounds much of the country’s land ownership. It’s time for the Land Registry database to be completed and opened up to all

“The ownership of land,” wrote the 19th-century radical economist Henry George, “is the great fundamental fact which ultimately determines the social, the political and … the moral condition of a people.”

Related: The Land Registry is the guardian of our most basic national resource | Peter Hetherington

Continue reading...

<p>From mountain-shaped apartment blocks to the centre of braised chicken reinventing itself as ‘Solar Valley’, China’s second (and third) tier cities are hiring big-name architects to get them noticed</p><p>From egg-shaped concert halls to skyscrapers reminiscent of big pairs of pants, China’s top cities are <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/architecture-design-blog/2014/oct/23/-sp-chinas-strangest-buildings-from-pairs-of-pants-to-ping-pong-bats">famously full of curious monuments to architectural ambition</a>. But as land prices in the main metropolises have shot into the stratosphere, developers have been scrambling to buy up plots in the country’s second and third-tier cities, spawning a new generation of delirious plans in the provinces. President<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/xi-jinping"> Xi Jinping</a> may have <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2016/02/25/china-moves-to-prevent-oversized-xenocentric-weird-architecture-news/">issued a directive last year</a> outlawing “oversized, xenocentric, weird” buildings, but many of these schemes were already well under way; his diktat has proved to be no obstacle to mayoral hubris yet.</p><p>From Harbin “City of Music” to Dezhou “Solar Valley”, provincial capitals are branding themselves as themed enclaves of culture and industry to attract inward investment, and commissioning scores of bold buildings to match. Even where there is no demand, city bureaucrats are relentlessly selling off land for development, hawking plots as the primary form of income – <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2014/aug/20/why-havent-chinas-cities-learned-from-americas-mistakes">accounting for 80% of municipal revenues in some cases</a>. In the last two months alone, 50 Chinese cities <a href="http://www.scmp.com/business/article/2076753/chinas-city-land-sales-surge-73-cent-despite-cooling-measures">received a total of 453bn yuan (£54bn) from land auctions </a>, a 73% increase on last year, and it’s the provincial capitals that are leading the way.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/mar/18/real-estate-revolution-unstoppable-building-boom-china">Continue reading...</a>

Put us on the map, please: China's smaller cities go wild for starchitecture

Mar 18, 2017 8:00

From mountain-shaped apartment blocks to the centre of braised chicken reinventing itself as ‘Solar Valley’, China’s second (and third) tier cities are hiring big-name architects to get them noticed

From egg-shaped concert halls to skyscrapers reminiscent of big pairs of pants, China’s top cities are famously full of curious monuments to architectural ambition. But as land prices in the main metropolises have shot into the stratosphere, developers have been scrambling to buy up plots in the country’s second and third-tier cities, spawning a new generation of delirious plans in the provinces. President Xi Jinping may have issued a directive last year outlawing “oversized, xenocentric, weird” buildings, but many of these schemes were already well under way; his diktat has proved to be no obstacle to mayoral hubris yet.

From Harbin “City of Music” to Dezhou “Solar Valley”, provincial capitals are branding themselves as themed enclaves of culture and industry to attract inward investment, and commissioning scores of bold buildings to match. Even where there is no demand, city bureaucrats are relentlessly selling off land for development, hawking plots as the primary form of income – accounting for 80% of municipal revenues in some cases. In the last two months alone, 50 Chinese cities received a total of 453bn yuan (£54bn) from land auctions , a 73% increase on last year, and it’s the provincial capitals that are leading the way.

Continue reading...

<p>With rates at an all-time low, lenders are offering other incentives to woo borrowers. But be warned: do the sums</p><p>With rates on many new mortgages at record lows, lots of lenders are offering cashback to make them stand out from the crowd. And some are dishing out quite large sums. The highest amount currently on offer is £2,500, courtesy of a Barclays deal. Two years ago it was £1,000.</p><p>But will you end up paying a heavy price for that “carrot” in the form of a higher interest rate?</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/mar/18/mortgage-cashback-deals-incentives">Continue reading...</a>

Are these cashback deals a carrot… or a costly stick?

Mar 18, 2017 7:00

With rates at an all-time low, lenders are offering other incentives to woo borrowers. But be warned: do the sums

With rates on many new mortgages at record lows, lots of lenders are offering cashback to make them stand out from the crowd. And some are dishing out quite large sums. The highest amount currently on offer is £2,500, courtesy of a Barclays deal. Two years ago it was £1,000.

But will you end up paying a heavy price for that “carrot” in the form of a higher interest rate?

Continue reading...

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