DaftDrop UK is a new UK-targeted branch of DaftDrop, the non-profit commercial property price tracker, bringing you an unbiased and impartial view of the England, Scotland & Wales property market, with the easiest & fastest price search engine online.

What does DaftDrop UK do?

DaftDrop UK is tracking over 1 million residential and commercial properties that were, or still are, for sale across the UK. DaftDrop UK provides an easy way to determine the market history of a property or area, and to gain insights into the overall property market throughout England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Why use this?

As a buyer, one of the main things you're interested in are price changes, right? Right. Knowing a property's history gives you, the buyer, a much better idea of the mindset of a seller, which is very valuable knowledge before entering negotiations.

For example, if a seller has dropped their prices several times in the last few months, you can be sure they're eager to sell. On the other hand, if a house has been on the market for years without much activity, it's less likely that the seller is clued in to the current market and their expectations may be unrealistic.

DaftDrop UK can:

  • Show price drops/increases, that are otherwise forgotton
  • Allows lightning fast and flexible sorting and searching
  • Show the real time on market
  • Show similar properties
  • Detect previous listings of the same property
  • Show unbiased, up-to-date trends via graphing
  • Automatically notify you of price changes in property you're interested in

Price Drops »

Estate Agents often:

  • Modify the ad's 'entered' date to make a property seem like it's fresh on the market
  • Or, re-create a whole knew ad, having the same effect
  • Increase price above actual expectation, just so an initial offer will be high
  • Change a price to Price On Application, because of lack of interest in an overpriced property

Price Drops »

<p>Ilford in east London has highest burglary rate in UK, says Moneysupermarket, after analysing insurance quotes. Where’s lowest? Northern Ireland</p><p>Households in parts of Ilford, east London, suffer the worst rates of burglary in the UK, according to insurance forms, although the number of break-ins continues to fall nationally.</p><p>Analysis of 1.8m home insurance quotes by Moneysupermarket.com over the past five years names the IG4 postcode, covering an area between Redbridge and Gants Hill in east London, as worst for burglary across the UK. </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jan/24/ilford-highest-burglary-uk-moneysupermarket-insurance-cambridge-manchester">Continue reading...</a>

UK postcodes with highest burglary rates revealed

Jan 24, 2017 12:26

Ilford in east London has highest burglary rate in UK, says Moneysupermarket, after analysing insurance quotes. Where’s lowest? Northern Ireland

Households in parts of Ilford, east London, suffer the worst rates of burglary in the UK, according to insurance forms, although the number of break-ins continues to fall nationally.

Analysis of 1.8m home insurance quotes by Moneysupermarket.com over the past five years names the IG4 postcode, covering an area between Redbridge and Gants Hill in east London, as worst for burglary across the UK.

Continue reading...

<p>Milton Keynes, now 50 years old, identified as the best-performing new town for property price growth over last 30 years</p><p>House price growth in Britain’s new towns has outperformed the national average over the past decade, a report has found.</p><p>Milton Keynes, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jan/20/50-reasons-love-milton-keynes-concrete-cows-wd-40">which is celebrating its 50th birthday</a>, was identified as the best-performing new town for property price growth over the last 30 years. New towns generally have seen house prices go up by 32% over the last 10 years, increasing by just over £55,500, from £173,337 in 2006 to £228,902 in 2016.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jan/23/uks-new-towns-surpass-national-average-for-house-price-growth">Continue reading...</a>

UK's new towns surpass national average for house price growth

Jan 23, 2017 0:01

Milton Keynes, now 50 years old, identified as the best-performing new town for property price growth over last 30 years

House price growth in Britain’s new towns has outperformed the national average over the past decade, a report has found.

Milton Keynes, which is celebrating its 50th birthday, was identified as the best-performing new town for property price growth over the last 30 years. New towns generally have seen house prices go up by 32% over the last 10 years, increasing by just over £55,500, from £173,337 in 2006 to £228,902 in 2016.

Continue reading...

<p>This property in France is just the ticket for the environmentally conscious buyer<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/jan/22/eco-home-france-buzz-about-it-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

An eco home with a real buzz about it – in pictures

Jan 22, 2017 7:00

This property in France is just the ticket for the environmentally conscious buyer

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Anyone have experience of one – surely it will end in stains and tears?<p><strong>Every week a Guardian Money reader submits a question, and it’s up to you to help him or her out – a selection of the best answers will appear in next Saturday’s paper.</strong></p><p><strong>This week’s question:</strong></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/blog/2017/jan/21/would-a-white-carpet-be-a-disaster-stains">Continue reading...</a>

Would a white carpet be a disaster?

Jan 21, 2017 7:00

Anyone have experience of one – surely it will end in stains and tears?

Every week a Guardian Money reader submits a question, and it’s up to you to help him or her out – a selection of the best answers will appear in next Saturday’s paper.

This week’s question:

Continue reading...

<p>Campaigners say growing instances of ‘No DSS’ are problematic</p><p>It used to be “No blacks, no Irish, no dogs”, now it’s “No DSS, no pets, no children”. Check out the rental listings on websites such as Rightmove, or press your nose against the window of your local lettings agent, and you will often see “No DSS”. It means the landlord or agent won’t rent a property to someone on housing benefit or local housing allowance, though some younger readers might not even know what “DSS” stands for (it’s Department of Social Security, and was replaced by the Department for Work and Pensions 16 years ago).</p><p>The racist signs once seen in the windows of houses with rooms to rent have long been consigned to history, but what about their 21st-century equivalent? How common is it, and does refusing to let a property to someone on housing benefit amount to unlawful discrimination? Campaigners say it’s problematic. <a href="http://blog.shelter.org.uk/2015/06/no-children-no-dogs-no-dss-the-alternative-landlord-guide/" title="">In a blog</a>, housing charity Shelter said: “Rising rents and shrinking wages mean that being in work is no longer a guarantee you won’t need help with housing costs. But if you do receive this help, it’s guaranteed that you will be openly discriminated against.”</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jan/21/housing-benefit-claimants-shut-out-private-rental-no-dss">Continue reading...</a>

Housing benefit claimants increasingly shut out of private rental market

Jan 21, 2017 7:00

Campaigners say growing instances of ‘No DSS’ are problematic

It used to be “No blacks, no Irish, no dogs”, now it’s “No DSS, no pets, no children”. Check out the rental listings on websites such as Rightmove, or press your nose against the window of your local lettings agent, and you will often see “No DSS”. It means the landlord or agent won’t rent a property to someone on housing benefit or local housing allowance, though some younger readers might not even know what “DSS” stands for (it’s Department of Social Security, and was replaced by the Department for Work and Pensions 16 years ago).

The racist signs once seen in the windows of houses with rooms to rent have long been consigned to history, but what about their 21st-century equivalent? How common is it, and does refusing to let a property to someone on housing benefit amount to unlawful discrimination? Campaigners say it’s problematic. In a blog, housing charity Shelter said: “Rising rents and shrinking wages mean that being in work is no longer a guarantee you won’t need help with housing costs. But if you do receive this help, it’s guaranteed that you will be openly discriminated against.”

Continue reading...

<p>The insurer is among a number of firms who turned down cover for a British family who bought a house for asylum seekers </p><p>A British family have spent more than £400,000 buying a house in Brighton for Syrian refugees in an extraordinary act of personal generosity – only to find that major UK insurers rejected them when they tried to buy buildings insurance.</p><p>Direct Line, one of the UK’s biggest home insurers, told the family that it would not agree to sell them a buildings policy because the Syrian refugees would be on benefits. “We were totally thrown by it,” says the donor, who spoke on condition of anonymity.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jan/21/direct-line-turned-down-insurance-homeowners-refugees">Continue reading...</a>

Direct Line turns its back on homeowners trying to help refugees

Jan 21, 2017 7:00

The insurer is among a number of firms who turned down cover for a British family who bought a house for asylum seekers

A British family have spent more than £400,000 buying a house in Brighton for Syrian refugees in an extraordinary act of personal generosity – only to find that major UK insurers rejected them when they tried to buy buildings insurance.

Direct Line, one of the UK’s biggest home insurers, told the family that it would not agree to sell them a buildings policy because the Syrian refugees would be on benefits. “We were totally thrown by it,” says the donor, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Continue reading...

<p>These properties, from Suffolk to Scotland, are perfect for a change in lifestyle<br></p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/gallery/2017/jan/20/homes-for-downsizers-in-pictures">Continue reading...</a>

Homes for downsizers – in pictures

Jan 20, 2017 23:00

These properties, from Suffolk to Scotland, are perfect for a change in lifestyle

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<p>It has it all – donkey rides, ice-cream sundaes, fish and chips, penny slots and a miniature railway</p><p>W<strong>hat’s going for it?</strong> I’ll warn you: I’m saving Scarborough for me. It’s mine, all mine. You can keep your Costa Brava and all of that palaver. This, where seasiding began in the 17th century, has all I require in life balanced beautifully in the perfect resort recipe: one measure donkey rides to two parts ice-cream sundaes, a dash of kiss-me-quick, a sprinkling of eccentricity (those daily mini naval&nbsp;battles on the lake in <a href="http://peasholmpark.com/">Peasholm Park</a>, for starters), a generous helping of fish and chips (cooked in dripping, natch), penny slots, funiculars (I&nbsp;love a funicular) <em>and</em> a miniature railway, a dash (but only a dash) of decline. I&nbsp;could, believe me, go on. What could possibly improve it? Well the locals are giving it a try. The&nbsp;spa’s revived, the new <a href="http://www.alpamare.co.uk/">Alpamare waterpark</a> is&nbsp;one of the fanciest in the UK (with an infinity pool – in Scarborough!), and the newly reinvented 1930s open-air theatre welcomes <a href="http://www.scarboroughopenairtheatre.com/2016/11/21/beach-boys-play-scarborough-open-air-theatre/">the Beach Boys</a> this summer. Back to their roots, you might say. Hope they wrap up warm. Next on the wish list? <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/wes-anderson">Wes Anderson</a> buys the <a href="https://www.britanniahotels.com/hotels/the-grand-hotel-scarborough/">Grand Hotel</a>. I can dream.</p><p><strong>The case against</strong> Out of the way. Even York’s a&nbsp;bit of a schlep. The mooted demolition of the fabulous <a href="http://www.futuristtheatre.co.uk/">Futurist Theatre</a> on the front: depressing.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jan/20/lets-move-scarborough-north-yorkshire-where-seasiding-began">Continue reading...</a>

Let’s move to Scarborough, North Yorkshire: ‘Where seasiding began’

Jan 20, 2017 16:30

It has it all – donkey rides, ice-cream sundaes, fish and chips, penny slots and a miniature railway

What’s going for it? I’ll warn you: I’m saving Scarborough for me. It’s mine, all mine. You can keep your Costa Brava and all of that palaver. This, where seasiding began in the 17th century, has all I require in life balanced beautifully in the perfect resort recipe: one measure donkey rides to two parts ice-cream sundaes, a dash of kiss-me-quick, a sprinkling of eccentricity (those daily mini naval battles on the lake in Peasholm Park, for starters), a generous helping of fish and chips (cooked in dripping, natch), penny slots, funiculars (I love a funicular) and a miniature railway, a dash (but only a dash) of decline. I could, believe me, go on. What could possibly improve it? Well the locals are giving it a try. The spa’s revived, the new Alpamare waterpark is one of the fanciest in the UK (with an infinity pool – in Scarborough!), and the newly reinvented 1930s open-air theatre welcomes the Beach Boys this summer. Back to their roots, you might say. Hope they wrap up warm. Next on the wish list? Wes Anderson buys the Grand Hotel. I can dream.

The case against Out of the way. Even York’s a bit of a schlep. The mooted demolition of the fabulous Futurist Theatre on the front: depressing.

Continue reading...

<p>Also, homes in which to sit out the perils of 2017 and our Consumer Champions do battle with Thomson and Virgin Trains<br></p><p>Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/money/2017/jan/19/friday-afternoon-conveyancing-fraud-10-year-mortgages">Continue reading...</a>

Friday afternoon conveyancing fraud, plus the merits of 10-year mortgages

Jan 19, 2017 14:49

Also, homes in which to sit out the perils of 2017 and our Consumer Champions do battle with Thomson and Virgin Trains

Hello and welcome to this week’s Money Talks – a roundup of the week’s biggest stories and some things you may have missed.

Continue reading...

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